Tag Archives: goal setting

Kids and vision boards

If there is one activity that is always a hit with kids, it’s creating a vision board.  I’ve used vision boards as a way to create focus for kids around different topics such as goal setting or determining an intention for the next season.

In a previous post, I talked about the importance of reviewing an intention that was set at the beginning of the year.  A great way to set an intention for the weeks or months ahead is to create a vision board around that intention.  Here’s how:

Use a vision board as a focus for goal setting

  • Have students write down their goal:
    • It could be a goal for the summer: Relax and enjoy my family and friends.
    • It could be a goal for a sport:  Place first or second in breaststroke for my swim team.
    • It could be an academic goal:  Read 5 books this summer.
  • Have students create a vision: Students can close their eyes and imagine accomplishing their goal.  What would it look like?  How would they feel? What would they be doing? How would their senses come into play (what would they touch, see, taste, smell?).
  • Have students  find a way to represent the vision: Students can cut out images and words or phrases from magazines that represent them accomplishing their goal.
  • Have students make their vision concrete:  Once they have accumulated enough images, they can glue the images on a piece of poster board.  Using markers or other creative tools, they can decorate their board so it is eye catching and memorable.
  • Have students share their boards with the class:  Research shows that goals that are shared are more likely to be accomplished. Have students identify how they will use the boards as inspiration and motivation for accomplishing their goal.

Related Posts:

Learning from Goal Setting

5 Effective Ways to Teach Kids in the Digital Age

The power of ‘not yet’ in changing behavior

End of School Year Special

Get all 7 Wyatt story books:

Wyatt Goes to Kindergarten

Wyatt Learns about Being Organized

Wyatt Learns about Winning

Wyatt Learns about Cooperation

Wyatt Learns about Friendship 

Wyatt Learns about Good Manners 

AND

Wyatt’s Book of Lesson Plans, Activities and Games

A $110 value for $95 (includes shipping)

 




Learning from goal setting

In an earlier post this year, I suggested that students set an intention for the year and review that intention midway through the school year and again at the end of the school year.  As the school year comes to a close, it is a good time to determine the success of that intention and use it as a way to measure progress while planning for the  year ahead.  Here’s how…

Three Questions for Reflection

  • Were you successful in reaching your goal or your intention?  Why or why not?
  • What did you learn from setting this goal?  What would you do again?  What would you change?  How much more successful could you be if you put forth your best effort for the next few months?
  • What is your goal or intention going forward?  Imagine yourself in 3 months, 6 months or a year if you are successful.  What would that look like?  What would be different?

Reflection on goals has been shown to be a powerful learning tool.  In fact, individuals who don’t take the time to reflect on their history, often fail to learn valuable lessons and repeat the same mistakes. Setting aside a specific time for regular reflection is a good habit to establish and what better time to do it than as the school year comes to a close?

Related Posts:

Begin School with Intention, Plan for Reflection 

The secret sauce to setting and achieving goals

How to create an intentional year

 

End of School Year Special

Get all 7 Wyatt story books:

Wyatt Goes to Kindergarten

Wyatt Learns about Being Organized

Wyatt Learns about Winning

Wyatt Learns about Cooperation

Wyatt Learns about Friendship 

Wyatt Learns about Good Manners 

AND

Wyatt’s Book of Lesson Plans, Activities and Games

A $110 value for $95 (includes shipping)

 




The secret to helping students develop grit

You are barely into the school year and already you have a sense about which students will be successful in your class and which ones will be slackers… don’t you?

Are you usually right?

How do you know?  What are the characteristics of the children who stay the course and succeed?

How are they different from students who give up and fail?

Angela Duckworth, Ph.D and author of the book, Grit;  The Power of Passion Perseverance, left  a high paying management job to teach math to seventh graders in the New York City Public Schools.  She soon found that the students who were successful were not necessarily the students with the highest IQ or the best home environment.  The deciding factor wasn’t luck or talent.  Instead, she found that they were the students who had an inner strength and resolve that others didn’t, often despite other obvious disadvantages. She named that inner strength grit and has spent the last several years researching and measuring that quality.  Here’s what she has found:  “Grit is about a goal you care about so much that it organizes and gives meaning to almost everything you do. And grit is holding steadfast to that goal. Even when you fall down. Even when you screw up. Even when progress toward that goal is halting or slow.”

So how does that relate to the kids in your classroom?  In the long run it relates to why they are there.  The student who understands and commits to their why is invariably the one who has grit.  They care.  They are invested.  They believe that they are moving closer to their goal even when they experience failure and disappointment.  Even when the work is hard. They have a vision for the future and they are committed.

You Can Help Students Develop Grit

So how do you help students develop grit?  Or is it just something that you are born with? No doubt some of it is determined by  temperament and the role models that students have in their lives.  But as significant adults in our students lives we can also help children understand and develop grit.  Here are two ways:

  1. Help students understand and set goals, in every area of their lives.  Academic goals. Relationship goals.  Physical goals.  Here’s the key though; go beyond the usual setting of goals. Teach children how to reach those dream big goals by setting small goals leading to large goals. Then teach them the importance of learning from mistakes and failure.
  2. Be the encourager in your student’s lives.  Everyone needs someone who believes in them and by seeing the future possibilities and sharing that vision with your students you can help them shape their future as well.

    Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Winning

    Wyatt the Wonder Dog didn’t make it on the All Star baseball team and he feels like a loser.  All  his friends will be playing baseball this summer, while he and his pesky sister, Callie, visit grandparents at the beach.  How Wyatt learns to handle disappointment and failure will be an important lesson for the future.  Will he give up trying new things?  Will he have the confidence to try again?  Are there some things that take more practice and persistence to learn than others? Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns About Winning
    Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Winning (Wyatt the Wonder Dog Books) (Volume 5)

 

How to Create an Intentional Year

January is the time of year for setting goals and planning for the future.  It’s also the time of year when it can be hard to drum up some excitement for the learning opportunities ahead. Blustery weather, overcast days and early nights when everyone is cooped up inside can quell even the most spirited among us.  The thrill of the beginning of school seems long gone and the anticipation of the end of the school year seems far, far away in the future.

What can we do to get off to a great start and create the conditions necessary for a great school year?  There’s a lot!

Five Strategies for a Magical and Intentional Year

  • Set an intention–Not to get all woo-woo on you here but this is a useful technique for whatever you are doing that is new.  Athletes, entertainers and CEO’s use this technique successfully to create optimum performance.  It can work equally well for educators.
    • Begin with the end in mind.  Picture or visualize how you want your classroom to be as we move into 2016.  The tendency is to be so busy doing (managing student behavior, putting up bulletin boards, making lessons plans) that we expend all of our energy and don’t take the time to be.  Imagine how you want the room to feel;  excited, enthusiastic, focused, curious, etc.
  • Revisit your teaching method–Look at your materials and curriculum with a renewed fresh look.  Imagine that you are seeing it for the first time.  How will you engage students, pique their curiosity, personalize the message?  Make sure the classroom environment reflects your new vision.
  • Stay positive–it is really easy to let the negative drag you down.  There are always too many things to do, too many students to adequately serve, too few resources, too many meetings to attend and not enough time.  Reserve judgement.  Expect the unexpected and see it as a learning experience.  Choose to be a positivity role model for your students and you will find your enthusiasm is contagious.
  • Focus on and process the experience as much as the material.  It’s easy to  bemoan the fact that it’s hard to teach or counsel students because of all the extenuating factors in their lives.  Instead view those circumstances as teachable moments.  Sometimes the biggest lesson you can teach is how to handle disappointment and adversity.
  • Take care of yourself–there will never be enough time to do it all.  One reason you became an educator was because of your creative, heart-centered giving spirit. Make sure sure that you direct that energy toward yourself as well as the students you serve.  When you take care of yourself, you are modeling for students how they can take care of themselves and that is an invaluable lesson.

By following a plan, you will be able to not only meet the expectations of parents and students, but also to enjoy the fruits of your efforts.

Grab ‘N Go Lesson Plan for Busy Educators:

Winning and Losing Lesson Plan

 

Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Winning

Wyatt the Wonder Dog didn’t make it on the All Star baseball team and he feels like a loser.  All  his friends will be playing baseball this summer, while he and his pesky sister, Callie, visit grandparents at the beach.  How Wyatt learns to handle disappointment and failure will be an important lesson for the future.  Will he give up trying new things?  Will he have the confidence to try again?  Are there some things that take more practice and persistence to learn than others? Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns About Winning
Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Winning (Wyatt the Wonder Dog Books) (Volume 5)

 

 

How to Raise a Resilient Child

child thinking2

What does your child do when faced with a challenging situation?

  1. Give Up
  2. Find an adult to fix the problem
  3. Attempt to solve the problem

In a previous post, I wrote about Kid President, the adversity, he has faced in his life and the resilience that he has shown in not only surviving  but thriving.  He is an inspiration to adults and children alike.

What is resilience?  It is the ability to recover from difficulties.

What are the key factors in developing resilience?  Here’s what we know about resilience:

  1. It is not genetic, it is a learned response.  This means as parents and educators we can not only be role models but teach our children to be resilient.
  2. Children who develop resilience most often have relationships that are characterized by boundaries, consistency and support.
  3. Children who are resilient don’t live lives that are always easy or fun.  Instead they develop self talk and coping skills to handle the challenges that life throws their way.

As we move into the new year, full of resolutions and goal setting, one important lesson that we can share with children is that goals are worthy endeavors even when they are difficult, time-consuming and energy draining.  Preconceived expectations often influence our efforts.   When children grow up in an environment where they expect everything to be fun, fast and easy, they don’t develop the necessary mindset to take on challenging goals.  Instead, children develop the mindset that “I deserve this because I want it,” rather than, “This is hard but I know I can do this.”

What can you do to teach your child resilience?

  1. Teach them to be problem solvers-Help children recognize that life is full of all kinds of problems for everyone.  Rather than fix problem situations for them, help them develop ways to think about the problem and through trial and error figure out ways to solve it themselves.
  2. Be a role model– Share with children the problems that you face and how you go about solving them.  Ask for their input.
  3. Maintain a positive outlook– Teach children that challenges can either be a burden or a gift, it is a choice. Let them know that you believe in their ability to do hard things.

Resilient children are hopeful children.  Despite personal doubts or fears, they are children who are willing to set goals even when they are hard and difficult. They are children who recognize their own ability to create change in the world.

Grab ‘N Go Lesson Plan on Goal Setting and Winning

Goal Setting Lesson Plan

Goals Worksheet

Books for Lesson Plans

Related Posts:

4 Secret Skills that Children Need to Succeed Today

Developing Resilience:  The Story Behind Kid President

3 Ways You may Accidentally Fail to Teach Leadership Skills

 

Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Winning

Wyatt the Wonder Dog didn’t make it on the All Star baseball team and he feels like a loser.  All  his friends will be playing baseball this summer, while he and his pesky sister, Callie, visit grandparents at the beach.  How Wyatt learns to handle disappointment and failure will be an important lesson for the future.  Will he give up trying new things?  Will he have the confidence to try again?  Are there some things that take more practice and persistence to learn than others? Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns About Winning
Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Winning (Wyatt the Wonder Dog Books) (Volume 5)