Category Archives: goal setting

Kids and vision boards

If there is one activity that is always a hit with kids, it’s creating a vision board.  I’ve used vision boards as a way to create focus for kids around different topics such as goal setting or determining an intention for the next season.

In a previous post, I talked about the importance of reviewing an intention that was set at the beginning of the year.  A great way to set an intention for the weeks or months ahead is to create a vision board around that intention.  Here’s how:

Use a vision board as a focus for goal setting

  • Have students write down their goal:
    • It could be a goal for the summer: Relax and enjoy my family and friends.
    • It could be a goal for a sport:  Place first or second in breaststroke for my swim team.
    • It could be an academic goal:  Read 5 books this summer.
  • Have students create a vision: Students can close their eyes and imagine accomplishing their goal.  What would it look like?  How would they feel? What would they be doing? How would their senses come into play (what would they touch, see, taste, smell?).
  • Have students  find a way to represent the vision: Students can cut out images and words or phrases from magazines that represent them accomplishing their goal.
  • Have students make their vision concrete:  Once they have accumulated enough images, they can glue the images on a piece of poster board.  Using markers or other creative tools, they can decorate their board so it is eye catching and memorable.
  • Have students share their boards with the class:  Research shows that goals that are shared are more likely to be accomplished. Have students identify how they will use the boards as inspiration and motivation for accomplishing their goal.

Related Posts:

Learning from Goal Setting

5 Effective Ways to Teach Kids in the Digital Age

The power of ‘not yet’ in changing behavior

End of School Year Special

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Wyatt Goes to Kindergarten

Wyatt Learns about Being Organized

Wyatt Learns about Winning

Wyatt Learns about Cooperation

Wyatt Learns about Friendship 

Wyatt Learns about Good Manners 

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Learning from goal setting

In an earlier post this year, I suggested that students set an intention for the year and review that intention midway through the school year and again at the end of the school year.  As the school year comes to a close, it is a good time to determine the success of that intention and use it as a way to measure progress while planning for the  year ahead.  Here’s how…

Three Questions for Reflection

  • Were you successful in reaching your goal or your intention?  Why or why not?
  • What did you learn from setting this goal?  What would you do again?  What would you change?  How much more successful could you be if you put forth your best effort for the next few months?
  • What is your goal or intention going forward?  Imagine yourself in 3 months, 6 months or a year if you are successful.  What would that look like?  What would be different?

Reflection on goals has been shown to be a powerful learning tool.  In fact, individuals who don’t take the time to reflect on their history, often fail to learn valuable lessons and repeat the same mistakes. Setting aside a specific time for regular reflection is a good habit to establish and what better time to do it than as the school year comes to a close?

Related Posts:

Begin School with Intention, Plan for Reflection 

The secret sauce to setting and achieving goals

How to create an intentional year

 

End of School Year Special

Get all 7 Wyatt story books:

Wyatt Goes to Kindergarten

Wyatt Learns about Being Organized

Wyatt Learns about Winning

Wyatt Learns about Cooperation

Wyatt Learns about Friendship 

Wyatt Learns about Good Manners 

AND

Wyatt’s Book of Lesson Plans, Activities and Games

A $110 value for $95 (includes shipping)

 




One Word Can Focus the Family in 2015

Onewordblog

Kids grow up so fast.

The world changes even faster.

What will your family be like in five years?  Ten years?

Do you have a vision for your family’s future?  Do you have an idea of the values and the principles that are your family’s foundation?

Stephen Covey  wrote extensively about the importance of having a vision for the future and the necessity of a family being proactive and beginning with the end in mind.  Although well known for his Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, he also wrote about and created a program for families to encourage them to design a family mission statement.

Why One Word?

Currently there is a movement to focus on one word for the year instead of creating resolutions or goals.  While I believe both to be important, I do think that focusing first on one word as a cornerstone for the year is a vital and worthwhile approach.  Most goals or resolutions fail because individuals focus on doing rather than first being.  While actions are important and necessary, they must first come from a mindset of who we want to be or our vision of our best self.

Even small children can be encouraged to select a word as their focus for the year.  I often did this exercise in classroom guidance lessons and students always enjoyed it.  Not only does it immediately engage their creative side but also gives great insight as to their interests and goals.

Selecting a Family Word

Once each member of the family has selected a word for the year, it is then time for everyone to share their words and then select a family word to focus on.  Some questions to think about might be:

What  words  would describe what you think the family should be?

What do you really want the family to accomplish together?

How should we treat each other?

How is our family different and unique?

How can our family be the best we can be?

What are your dreams for our family?

Write down the ideas and then select one or more words for the family to focus on for the year.

Making a Family Vision Board

One way to creatively extend the selection of one word is by creating a family vision board.  Families can create a vision board by illustrating their family word (or words) with pictures, photographs, and words or phrases cut from magazines or even drawn on poster board. It can be a fun and eye-opening experience that becomes a visual reminder each day of what the  family values .  Even young children can help with this project and interact with the family over shared goals.

Just as determining your own one word can empower you personally and help you determine your priorities, it can transform the family as well.  Whether you are planning a vacation or chastising a child for a behavior problem, you can ask both the child and yourself:  Am I following our family’s one word with my words and actions?  If not, how can I change my words and actions so that I am true to the mission of our family?   I can’t think of anything more powerful that you can do as a parent to develop a focus in 2015 than to select one word to guide you.

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