Category Archives: communication

Seven Secrets to Effective Teacher-Parent Communication

In my last post, I identified ten ways that teachers could establish effective communication with parents. Communication however, is a two way street.  Parents also have a responsibility and an opportunity to establish a relationship with their child’s teacher. Here are seven ways to create open communication while empowering your child to be a leader in their own right:

Seven Secrets to Effective Teacher-Parent Communication

  1. Express appreciation- Everyone wants to be appreciated-teachers included. Look for a way early on to express your gratitude for the teacher’s hard work and dedication in the classroom.  Even if you have areas of concern, begin with the positive and set a positive tone.
  2. Determine the regular routines for communication and stay engaged-Does work go home once weekly or daily? How often should you check agendas, backpacks, special folders? Is there a weekly newsletter that you can read to stay abreast of classroom activities?  Be proactive and don’t wait for there to be a problem to get involved.
  3. Determine the time frames that teachers are available and respect them– Do they prefer a note?  an email?  When is it too late to call?   We all have busy, complicated lives that involve juggling many roles and teachers need time with their families away from the demands of work.
  4. Be authentic–Let teachers know about changes and challenges that your child may be facing.  Is the family going through a stressful time at home?  Have they been sick?  Are they on medication that might affect their performance?  Any of these things can impact a child’s ability to focus and excel  in the classroom.  The more the teacher knows about your particular child, the better the chance they will connect in a positive way.
  5. Be open to suggestions– Even if it is a new way of doing things, listen when teachers suggest alternative ways of teaching a child new concepts.  What may have worked well previously may not be the best approach as your child develops and changes. You don’t have to follow every suggestion but honor the request with your attention.
  6. Share your expertise and insight-As a parent,  you are the expert on your child. You know their history, their abilities and their quirks.  Share what you know so teachers can teach to their strengths.
  7. Encourage and empower your child to be an effective communicator and leader-While it’s important for you as the parent to stay involved with your child’s teacher, it’s equally important for your child to learn what they are responsible for and how to communicate their needs.  Communicating with the teacher doesn’t mean taking over your child’s responsibilities or solving all their problems for them.  Instead, model for them how to be a leader and problem solver in their own life.  As it is age appropriate, transfer that responsibility for  effective communication to them.  After all it is their academic success and only they can achieve it.

Other ideas?  I’d love to hear them in the comments section…

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 New!!  

Wyatt the Wonder Dog Learns about Friendship

It’s not easy being the new kid at school, especially if you are a cat and everyone else is a dog.  How do you make friends?  Can you even be friends with someone who is totally different from you?  Wyatt the Wonder Dog helps solve Ami’s friendship problem with empathy and compassion. A great story for teaching children the critical life skill of making friends.

Wyatt the Wonder Dog-Friendship Cover (1)

Wyatt Learns about Friendship

Ten Secrets to Effective Parent-Teacher Communication

As the school year begins, an important part of starting school for every teacher is establishing communication with parents.  This is especially true in the younger years but even in later years, teachers have a responsibility to keep parents informed.  Depending on how you set up your system, this can be a chore or an opportunity to engage parents in a positive way in their child’s education.  Here are ten ways to insure success without stressing yourself out…

Ten Secrets to Effective Parent-Teacher Communication

  1. Have a plan for positive feedback-Every parent wants their child to be successful and you can start the year off on a positive note by sharing something positive in the first week of school with parents.  Since kids are usually on their best behavior for the first week or so, this shouldn’t be too hard!  Make sure every parent hears something positive from you about their child.
  2. Set boundaries around your time and let parents know what they are–Be clear about when you can answer questions and at what point you are available to respond to emails and/or phone calls.  This is important for parents but it’s also important for your peace of mind. You are doing yourself and the parents a favor when you define the time that  you are off work and spending time with your own family.
  3. Have regular routines for communication-Let parents know what they can expect from you.  Does work go home once weekly or daily? How often should they check agendas, backpacks, special folders?  Don’t assume parents will just naturally understand what you expect.  Make it clear from the beginning… then remind them periodically.  We all have busy, complicated lives that involve juggling many roles.
  4. Be authentic–Let parents know something about you and your own story.  If you are a parent with preschoolers and juggling your career with being a parent, let parents know.  If you are working on your masters at night and teaching during the day, share that.  This doesn’t mean you are looking for sympathy or support (hopefully you are getting that elsewhere!), just that the more real you are with others, the better the chance you will connect in a positive way.
  5. Be open to suggestions– Even if you’ve done something the same way for the last fifteen years, listen when parents suggest changing in some way.  What may have worked well in the beginning, may no longer be the best way to stay in touch. You don’t have to follow every suggestion or whim but honor the request with your attention.
  6. Be aware that everything you do is communication-While there are many formal ways that you will communicate, be aware that everything you do is communication.  Even displaying student work, jotting a quick note on a homework paper or the wording in your weekly newsletter or your class website, leaves a permanent impression of who you are.  Always consider how it will come across to others.
  7. Express gratitude-Teachers are usually great at writing thank you notes for end of the year gifts but what about a thank you for the parent who spent time running off copies for you or the one who was a chaperon during the field trip?  Again, it doesn’t have to be a formal note.  A smile and a sincere thanks can work just as well.
  8. Recognize parent effort-Most parents are putting forth a lot of effort to be the best they know how to be.  Be sure to give them a compliment even for things that we might consider “expected”.  Thank them for taking the time to attend a meeting or for making sure their child completes homework, for example. You never know the effort or the story behind the end result.
  9. Share your expertise and insight-As a teacher, you have the benefit of knowing various ways to differentiate and improve the teaching experience. You also have the benefit of teaching a wide variety of abilities.  Share what you know and see so parents can extend the lesson at home.
  10. Prepare parents ahead of time for meetings–Most parents don’t know what to expect when they attend meetings. For many, it is an intimidating experience. Prepare them ahead of time by letting them know the time frame, who will be there, the content and the decisions that may be made at the meeting.  This will help parents not only be more comfortable but will give them some insight into what questions they might have.

Other ideas?  I’d love to hear them in the comments section…

 

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Know someone who is starting kindergarten?

Wyatt Goes to Kindergarten

Wyatt has never liked change, at least not at first.  Once he tries something new, he usually finds he really likes it.  Now that he is about to begin kindergarten, Wyatt is really worried.  Will he make friends?  Will he get lost in the new school?  Will he miss his mom?  Join Wyatt in his latest “wonder-full” adventure!Wyatt-kKindergarten_thumb
Wyatt the Wonder Dog: Goes to Kindergarten